I’m working on a project, and I chose Azure as my cloud provider.

This series of articles attempts to explore Azure, share learning experiences, and improve my knowledge in the Azure ecosystem. I call it the ecosystem because Microsoft has built many tools in almost every tech field–Cognitive Services is my topping my favorite list.

Microsoft’s target is usually the Enterprise, but I think they have worked on some pretty slick tools you can explore yourself. If you think about it, Microsoft probably owns most of the tools you use for development – from VS Code, GitHub, and npm for a start. If you’re a .NET developer, there’s a high chance your entire stack/ tools is Microsoft’s.

For the infrastructure, I settled on the following services: - Azure DevOps - Azure Repos (similar to GitHub) - Azure Boards (similar to GitHub Projects) - Azure Pipelines (similar to GitHub Actions) - Azure Functions - App Service - Static Web Apps

The most important reason I stuck with Azure for the entire stack was to reduce the indecision I would get myself into trying to pick the best tool for the job.

The second reason is all resources provisioned will be located in one place – the Azure portal. And I have credits, so why not use them. ¯\_ (ツ)_/¯

For the apps, here’s the stack I stuck with: - TypeScript for both the frontend and backend - GraphQL for the API using apollo-server – the azure functions variant –, nexus and nexus-result-field - Prisma as my database client - Azure SQL - React - React-Query for data fetching

Since this is just the beginning, there is no proper infrastructure setup – no automated test, preview, and release pipelines on DevOps – and no adequate development/ preview/ production environments set up either.

These are the problems I seek to learn, solve, and write.